filltheairupwithlove:
knitsophrenic:
fandomsandfeminism:
generalmaluga:
albinwonderland:
fandomsandfeminism:
betterthanabortion:
"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.
Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.
See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 
Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 
To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 
You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 
reblogging for commentary 
But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 
First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 
And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.
Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.
If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 
When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.
When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 
And that is gross. 
Several Valid Points
I say this every time I reblog it, but: Yes.  
A simple “yes” should suffice.
Not really.
But wait, hear me out. In matters of life and death, we actually have little autonomy. Society, families, and the people we choose to have in our lives make our decisions with us. If you really want to be an organ donor, someone else decides if you can actually donate (you must be eligible). When you make clear your request not to be resuscitated, a scared, well-meaning family member can change your code status at the bedside while you are dying. When you are pregnant and choose to stay pregnant, your body is not yours anymore. 
This is why it’s important to seek societal understanding about abortion. People have access to abortion because pregnancy is physically, psychologically, economically and philosophically challenging regardless of the circumstances surrounding it. 
Perhaps we could improve the public perception by telling stories that support the notion that abortion is important and normal. It gives people a second chance. It gives people opportunity and people don’t often regret the choice. (It is also true that abortion sucks. It reflects desperation or a hopeless situation. Nobody wants to be in a position where they have to have an abortion.)
Yesterday, I had a patient who had a 6-year-old son with cystic fibrosis. The mother was in the hospital because of a substance abuse problem. During her admission she was found to be 5 weeks pregnant with a second child with a 1 in 4 chance of also having cystic fibrosis. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy. Everyone supported the decision. I work at a catholic hospital.

filltheairupwithlove:

knitsophrenic:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.

See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 

Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 

To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 

You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 

And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.

Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.

If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 

When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.

When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 

And that is gross. 

Several Valid Points

I say this every time I reblog it, but: Yes.  

A simple “yes” should suffice.

Not really.

But wait, hear me out. In matters of life and death, we actually have little autonomy. Society, families, and the people we choose to have in our lives make our decisions with us. If you really want to be an organ donor, someone else decides if you can actually donate (you must be eligible). When you make clear your request not to be resuscitated, a scared, well-meaning family member can change your code status at the bedside while you are dying. When you are pregnant and choose to stay pregnant, your body is not yours anymore.

This is why it’s important to seek societal understanding about abortion. People have access to abortion because pregnancy is physically, psychologically, economically and philosophically challenging regardless of the circumstances surrounding it.

Perhaps we could improve the public perception by telling stories that support the notion that abortion is important and normal. It gives people a second chance. It gives people opportunity and people don’t often regret the choice. (It is also true that abortion sucks. It reflects desperation or a hopeless situation. Nobody wants to be in a position where they have to have an abortion.)

Yesterday, I had a patient who had a 6-year-old son with cystic fibrosis. The mother was in the hospital because of a substance abuse problem. During her admission she was found to be 5 weeks pregnant with a second child with a 1 in 4 chance of also having cystic fibrosis. She wanted to terminate the pregnancy. Everyone supported the decision. I work at a catholic hospital.

Reblogged from Hey Hope

Some things that —for me— do what they say they do:

Siberian Rhodiola - Helps with focus during times of high stress.

Melatonin - Half a pill (1.5 mg) makes me want to go to sleep. Right now.

Vitamin supplements are for the birds! (Iron is pretty good though.)

Tags: snakeoil

We’re Amazing Parents!

(While packing to go visit my Dad.)

Matt: You wont stay up late! You’ll fall right to sleep! You’ll be too drunk!
Me: No I won’t! I don’t have enough calories left for that…
…Unless I drink straight vodka!

———————-

(Matt in the other room, unfurling blankets, making two-year-old son’s bed)

Matt: Oh, Pefect!
Me: What? Did you find a rogue turd? He’s been pooping places since we watched that Panda Handstand Video.
Matt: Even better! It’s a painkiller!* I lost it last night while I was reading him a bedtime story!
Me: You do realize that if our son ate that we would have to take him to the hospital.


*Prescribed

Tags: alltalk

I’d Rather Be Exercising Outside But…

If something is keeping you from it (like a napping child), ain’t nothin’ wrong with watching Roseanne re-runs for an hour while you plod along on your equipment. 

It’s a damn fine show. 

theatlantic:

How Forks Gave Us Overbites and Pots Saved the Toothless

Until around 250 years ago in the West, archaeological evidence suggests that most human beings had an edge-to-edge bite, similar to apes. In other words, our teeth were aligned liked a guillotine, with the top layer clashing against the bottom layer. Then, quite suddenly, this alignment of the jaw changed: We developed an overbite, which is still normal today. The top layer of teeth fits over the bottom layer like a lid on a box.
Read more. [Image: Flickr]

theatlantic:

How Forks Gave Us Overbites and Pots Saved the Toothless

Until around 250 years ago in the West, archaeological evidence suggests that most human beings had an edge-to-edge bite, similar to apes. In other words, our teeth were aligned liked a guillotine, with the top layer clashing against the bottom layer. Then, quite suddenly, this alignment of the jaw changed: We developed an overbite, which is still normal today. The top layer of teeth fits over the bottom layer like a lid on a box.

Read more. [Image: Flickr]

Reblogged from The Atlantic

theatlantic:

How Great Art Transcends Disability

When Judy first arrived at Creative Growth, says Joyce, “they couldn’t get her to do much of anything.” Judy did not like painting, sewing or sculpture class. Then she found her medium in a fiber arts class taught by textile artist Sylvia Seventy. She started wrapping. Yarn disappeared. Magazines disappeared. Even chairs and bike wheels disappeared. All of it would emerge later in colorfully woven sculptures. She even created pieces that looked like twins reaching towards one another.

“As she became more confident about her art, she became more confident about her place in the world,” says Ilana. “She became more extravagant, wearing scarves, head wraps, jangly things, necklaces.” With intense concentration, Judith worked five days a week for eighteen years, producing over 200 cocoon-like sculptures. “If you came to visit her while she worked,” says Ilana, “she would shoo you away.” Judith became the first artist with Down’s Syndrome to be featured in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Her work is in permanent museum collections in New York City, Paris, and London.

Read more. [Images: Leon Borensztein]

Reblogged from The Atlantic

This is hilarious and triumphant.